Principles of Fitness – The F.I.T.T. principles. How to increase your performance in 2020 whilst social distancing.

My name is Darius McDonald and welcome to my blog. I have been a fitness professional, personal trainer (online personal trainer), and sports massage therapist since 2008. My clients and I have been experiencing personal bests during this period of practicing social distancing in 2020 as per the latest government advice to help reduce the speed of transmission of covid-19. My strava account is looking sweet.

You can follow me here: https://www.strava.com/athletes/32778096 . I wanted to share some top tips and advice about how you can do the same. The fitter you are during these times, the better. Having a better level of fitness will result in a better level of health and a stronger immune system. This is part 1 of many in the series of “How to increase your performance in 2020 whilst social distancing” and if you implement these guidelines you should see an increase in your physical performance and feel a lot fitter and ultimately healthier for it.

FITT principles – Frequency, Intensity, Time, Type

These are the variables to consider when creating and taking part in an exercise programme. Here are some definitions to set a foundation of understanding.

Frequency= The number of times you train per week.

Intensity= The perceived or measured difficulty of the session.

Time= The duration of the session.

Type= Or modality – the concept that you can vary the exercises to still support the overall goal you are working towards. This can help to keep up the overall volume without overtraining the same type of exercise, mitigating some injury risk.
 

Some people train too much. It is easy to get addicted to exercise and the same type of exercise over and over again, but it can lead to injury problems by either straining a fatigued muscle or repetitive strain injuries where the body is just experiencing too much inflammation and never able to complete the natural healing cycle. We can use the FITT principles to help mitigate injury risk and improve athletic performance.
 

Let’s take running as an example. STOP RUNNING EVERY DAY! Most people are not able to run every day without injury risk building up and eventually occurring. So please, unless you are an elite athlete follow the guidelines I am about to lay out below. Now, pinch of salt here, everyone is slightly different and if you want to book a consultation with me to discuss a bespoke plan for you, then get in touch. I am available on most social media platforms. But here are the basics for runners:
 

FITT GUIDELINES by 100percentfitness to get you to your true potential, whilst mitigating injury risk.

Frequency of running 

3x per week, with at least one day off of running in   between runs.

Intensity of runs

1x “pace up” where you may go for a personal best or   personal record – at around 85% to 95% maxHR

1x “recovery pace” where you keep a more gentle pace –   at around 60% maxHR

1x “distance pusher” where your intensity is high   aerobic – around 75-85% of maxHR

Time – Duration of runs

This will change every week or two and ties in with progressive   overload and depends on where you are in your training at this moment. Here   is an idea for you to either scale up or down depending on whether you are   just getting started or have been running for many months or years already.   Distances are in Kilometres.

Beginner with an average to low fitness base   going from running rarely to improving a 5km personal best

Wk1= 3,3,5

Wk2= 3,3,5

Wk3= 3,4,5

Wk4= 3,4,5

Wk5= 3,4,6

Wk6= 3,4,6

And so on…

Intermediate level runner with good base of   fitness going from 10km to 10miles for longest ever run

Wk1= 5,5,10

Wk2= 5,5,11

Wk3= 5,6,12

Wk4= 5,6,13

Wk5= 5,7,14

Wk6= 5,7,15

Wk7= 5,8,16

And continue to progress weekly output until reaching half marathon level if desired.

Type of Training or modality

3x runs per week with a solid warm up and cool down for mobility and flexibility built in.

1x Leg Burner Home Circuit session per week for leg strength and endurance to be carried out the day after the “pace up” run.

1x Core and Upper body strength/endurance session per week to be carried out the day before the “pace up” or “distance pusher”.

2x active recovery days – Go for walks or bike rides and have a good stretch for 10 to 20mins afterwards.

So to progress this to a weekly calendar to give you an even better template, let’s look at week 1 = 3,3,5 from “Beginner with an average to low fitness base   going from running rarely to improving a 5km personal best”

Monday “Home core and Upper Body Blast”. (Blog post with video to be released at a later date.)

Tuesday 3km “pace up” run with warm up and cool down added on. (Blog post with video to be released about how to warm up and cool down properly at a later date.)

Wednesday “Leg burner home circuit using bodyweight”. (Blog post with video to be released at a later date.)

Thursday 3km “recovery pace” run with warm up and cool down added on.

Friday 30-60 minute walk or bike with 20minutes of foam rolling/self massage and stretching. (Blog post with video on how to use a foam roller and improve mobility to be released at a later date.)

Saturday 5km “distance pusher” run with warm up and cool down added on.

Sunday 30-60 minute walk or bike with 20minutes of foam rolling/self massage and stretching. 

That wraps up part 1 of this series. Like what you have read? Like and share it to help me be able to produce more content for you. Sign up to our mailing list to be notified of the next release.

Stay at home, and stay safe folks.

Written By Darius McDonald, Owner and Lead Trainer at 100percentfitness Limited

2 Responses to “Principles of Fitness – The F.I.T.T. principles. How to increase your performance in 2020 whilst social distancing.

  • Jill Mann
    3 months ago

    Thanks Darius, this is really informative and I look forwards to your next blog and guidelines to follow during social distancing. I will definitely be sharing your expertise.

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